Prague - Franz Kafka

For most people two names spring to mind when they hear the words Jewish Prague. The first is Rabbi Loew and the second is Franz Kafka. Worldwide Kafka is probably the best-known Jewish figure linked to the Czech lands alongside Rabbi Loew. His letters, diaries, short stories and novels rank among the most important works of 20th century world literature. However, it is not just his work that has made him immortal.
km
4
days
1
sights
8
 
Title
Franz Kafka was born in Prague on 3 July 1883. Though he wrote in German, he is closely bound to Prague both as a man and as an artist. The genius loci of the city’s Old Town, where he spent the greater part of his life, had an absolutely fundamental influence on his work. He did not see eye to eye with his father and suffered health problems all his life, which is perhaps why he always suffered from self-doubt and a lack of confidence. This was also reflected in his relationships with women, which were invariably complicated. He had a similar relationship to his work.


©Libor Sváček

He loved literature and regarded it as his true calling, but still spent his whole working life in insurance. Though by all accounts he hated his job, he could still be proud of his successes and career advancements. This too attests to an imbalance in his personality, to the doubts that forever accompanied him. He lived like an ascetic, neither drinking nor smoking, and was a vegetarian for most of his life. He was also a convinced Zionist who was proud of his Jewish origins, studied Hebrew diligently and dreamt of living in the land promised to the nation of Israel by God. His support throughout his life was another German-language Prague writer, Max Brod. Brod only “betrayed” Kafka once, making a decision that allows us to read the author’s greatest works today; he did not respect Kafka’s will, in which he demanded that all of his manuscripts, as yet unpublished, be destroyed. Among them were Kafka’s two key works, The Trial and The Castle. Like his psyche, Kafka’s body was fragile and he received treatment for tuberculosis for many years, spending part of his life at sanatoriums. He succumbed to the treacherous disease at the age of just 40. His legacy is immortal, however.

Day 1

km
4
hrs
5
sights
8
Your tour in the footsteps of Franz Kafka starts at the house where he was born at Náměstí Franze Kafky (Franz Kafka Square). From there it is just a few dozen metres north on Maiselova St. to the
Jewish Town Hall and Old-New Synagogue, a frequent destination for the writer. Maiselova intersects with Široká St. and the latter leads you to a small park between the Spanish Synagogue and the Church of the Holy Spirit where you will find the Franz Kafka Monument, unveiled in 2003. From the monument head north on Dušní until you reach Bílkova St. No. 10 was the home of Kafka’s sister Valli and the writer lived there twice, in 1914 and 1915. Now turn back towards the monument and take the street V Kolkovně to Dlouhá, where at no. 10, known as the House at the Golden Pike, Kafka lived from 1915 to 1917. Continue along Dlouhá in a south-westerly direction and you will get to Old Town Square. The writer lived for a number of years at no. 5 (Oppelt House) and no. 2 (House at the Minute). On the eastern side of the square starts Celetná, the street where Kafka lived with his family from 1892 to 1907, specifically at no. 3. Turn right into Kamzíková before following Železná, Rytířská and na Můstku all the way to Wenceslas Square. In the upper part, at no. 19, is the building of the Assicurazioni Generali insurance company where Kafka worked and built a successful career. Then head back to the lower part of the square and on to Perlová St., then across Uhelný trh to Skořepka; Kafka’s great friend, the writer Max Brod, lived at no. 1. From there go via Na Perštýně to Národní, where at no. 22 you will find Café Louvre, where Kafka and Brod spent long hours discussing literature and Zionism. From there you can go via the square Betlémské náměstí and Liliová St. to Charles Bridge. When you cross the river take a right into Cihelná, location of the Franz Kafka Museum. For your last port of call you will need to take a car or go by metro or tram to the stop Želivského on the other side of the city, where Vinohrady meets Žižkov. At Izraelská 1 you will find the New Jewish Cemetery, location of the tomb of Franz Kafka and his parents; a plan at the entrance to the cemetery will help you find it without difficulty.

Common Tips

With more than a century of tradition behind it, Café Louvre is a stylish spot for lunch or coffee and a piece of cake. Alongside Kafka, its patrons have included Karel Čapek, Otto Pick, Franz Werfel and Albert Einstein.

Transportation

The itinerary is designed for walkers, though it can be combined with public transport.

Day 1

km
4
hrs
5
sights
8

Franz Kafka Square and the house where he was born

Náměstí Franze Kafky (Franz Kafka Square) was created in the year 2000 from part of Radnice St. and links that street with two others, Maislova and Kaprova. The spot was not chosen by chance: it is just there that the house where the legendary writer was born once stood. Though it was knocked down during clearance of the Jewish Quarter in 1897, it is at least recalled by a plaque.

Address

Nám. Franze Kafky 18/6
110 00 Praha 1
GPS: 50.087621, 14.419527

The Jewish Town Hall

Mordechai Maisel had many buildings constructed in Prague’s Jewish Quarter in his time. Among the most important were the High Synagogue, the Maisel Synagogue and the “klauses” (small buildings) on the site where the Klaus Synagogue now stands.

Address

Maiselova 18, 110 01, Praha 1
GPS: 50.089363, 14.418631

The Old-New Synagogue

Even the mere fraction remaining of the Prague ghetto is amongst the most valuable Jewish monument in Europe. One of the most admired places, apart from the Old Jewish Cemetery from the beginning of the 15th century, the Jewish Museum and several synagogues is the Old-New Synagogue, as well as being amongst the oldest preserved Gothic buildings in Prague!

Address

Maiselova 18
110 00 Praha 1
GPS: 50.0900742, 14.4185958

Opening Hours

Entry fees

Standard fee: 200 Kč

Children fee: 140 Kč

Student fee: 140 Kč

The Spanish Synagogue in Prague

This, newest of the six historic Prague synagogues was built in the Spanish Moorish style in the second half of the 19th century.

Address

Vězeňská 141/1
110 00 Praha 1
GPS: 50.090209, 14.421019

Opening Hours

Entry fees

Standard fee: 70 Kč

Children fee: 50 Kč

Senior fee: 50 Kč

Student fee: 50 Kč

Franz Kafka Monument

Legendary Prague native Franz Kafka was incomprehensibly overlooked in the city for a long time. A square bearing his name was only created in 2000 and he only received a monument three years later. Its originality has sparked great passion since the beginning.

Address

Dušní ulice
110 00 Praha 1
GPS: 50.090105, 14.420676

Old Town Square

Where does the true heart of Prague beat? On the Old Town Square of course! It is precisely here that winding lanes of the Old Town run, in order to spill out onto the most beautiful square in Prague. The elegant tower of the Town Hall with the world famous astronomical clock, the proud silhouette of the fairytale Týn Cathedral, the monumental Church of St. Nicholas and countless multicoloured houses of many styles lend this place a unique atmosphere, which will captivate all those who decide to take a look at its charm.

Address

Staroměstské náměstí 110 00 Praha 1
GPS: 50.087472, 14.420734

Franz Kafka Museum

Franz Kafka (1883–1924), a Czech writer who wrote in German, is one of the most significant figures of the 20th century. At the heart of his literary, and real, world was Prague – and it is to Kafka and Prague that the exhibition in the Hergertova cihelna (Franz Kafka Museum) in the Lesser Quarter, in the heart of Kafka’s native city, is devoted.

Address

Cihelná 2b
118 00 Praha 1
GPS: 50.088072, 14.409849

Opening Hours

Entry fees

Standard fee: 200 Kč

Children fee: 120 Kč

Family fee: 540 Kč

Senior fee: 120 Kč

Student fee: 120 Kč

The New Jewish Cemetery at Olšany

When the old cemetery in Josefov ceased to meet the needs of Prague’s Jewish Community in terms of size it was decided in 1890 to build a new, larger cemetery that would suffice for at least 100 years. This gave rise to a burial site measuring over 10 hectares and projected to hold approximately 100,000 graves.

Address

Izraelská 712/1, 13 00, Praha 3
GPS: 50.080887, 14.478954

Opening Hours

Obecní dům - Francouzská restaurace Art Nouveau

If you are looking for a restaurant that ranks among the crème de la crème of Czech gastronomy, be sure not to miss Francouzská restaurace (French Restaurant) Art Nouveau.

Address

Nám. Republiky 5
110 00 Praha 1
GPS: 50.087640, 14.428217

CzechHouse Grill & Rotisserie

If you like to see how an experienced chef prepares your food, this restaurant is the place for you.

Address

Pobřežní 1
110 00 Praha 1
GPS: 50.093343, 14.439636

Dinitz

In the case of the Dinitz it is completely certain that the food you select will be prepared kosher. That is because the restaurant boasts an ample guarantee: a certificate from Prague’s chief rabbi.

Address

Bílkova 869/12
110 00 Praha-Staré Město
GPS: 50.091090, 14.421006

King Solomon

The King Solomon restaurant specialises in the traditional pre-war Jewish dishes of Central and Eastern Europe. While this alone makes it unique, it also delivers products that are free of chemical additives and made from scratch. 

Address

Široká 7/37
110 00 Praha 1
GPS: 50.089380, 14.418738

Radisson Blu Alcron hotel, La Rotonde

Thanks to extremely elegant Art Deco interior, you will be won over by the La Rotonde restaurant, which is located at the Radisson Blu Alcron Hotel, the moment you step inside.

Address

Štěpánská 40/623
110 00 Praha 1
GPS: 50.079867, 14.426791

Obecní dům - Plzeňská restaurace

The Plzeňská restaurace (Pilsen Restaurant) restaurant is located in the basement of the Municipal House on Prague’s Náměstí republiky (Republic Sq.). 

Address

Nám. Republiky 5
110 00 Praha 1
GPS: 50.087640, 14.428217

Restaurace Shalom

Located on the ground floor of the Jewish Town Hall, where Prague’s Jewish Community has its headquarters, Shalom offers strictly kosher food whose preparation is overseen by Rabbi Menachem Kalchaim.

Address

Maiselova 18
110 00 Praha 1
GPS: 50.089688, 14.418386

Restaurant & Garden Platina

Czech cuisine improved via modern techniques and ingredients has been a growing trend in recent times. Among the restaurants working to build on and further develop this style of cooking is Restaurant & Garden Platina.

Address

Karolíny Světlé 27
110 00 Praha 1
GPS: 50.083613, 14.414307

Švejk Restaurant U Karla

There are several restaurants in Prague whose names refer to Jaroslav Hašek’s popular literary character the Good Soldier Švejk. However, this is one of the few with a genuinely rich tradition.

Address

Křemencova 7
110 00 Praha 1
GPS: 50.078489, 14.417209

Clarion Old Town Prague

If you have decided to spend a few days in Prague, this hotel is the perfect choice thanks above all to its unique location in the historical centre of Prague, a mere five minutes by foot from Old Town Square and Náměstí Republiky (Republic Square).

Address

Clarion Hotel Prague Old Town ****
Hradební 9
110 00 Praha
GPS: 50.092737, 14.426444

EA Hotel Embassy

EA Hotel Embassy is located in a building constructed in neo-Renaissance style in 1880. It subsequently received an Art Deco renovation and the hotel’s present interior has naturally been adapted to fit that style.

Address

EA Hotel Embassy Prague ****
Petrská 1167/31
110 00 Praha 1
GPS: 50.092214, 14.435649

EA Hotel Juliš

Everybody has a different opinion when it comes to the discussion about where the absolute centre of Prague lies. However, the prevailing view is that the bustling Wenceslas Square can be regarded as the centre of the city. EA Hotel Juliš stands right on the thoroughfare, but there you will find none of the hectic pace or landmarks that exist outside.

Address

EA Hotel Juliš ****
Václavské náměstí 782/22
110 00 Praha
GPS: 50.082976, 14.424727

Hotel King David

If one is looking for a place to stay, it is hard to imagine a better location in Prague than that boasted by Hotel King David, which is in direct proximity to the historical centre, the main shopping area and the business district.

Address

Hotel King David Prague *****
Hybernská 42
110 00 Praha 1
GPS: 50.087933, 14.436722

Hotel Leonardo Prague

Hotel Leonardo has 82 rooms, each of which has its own unmistakable distinctive charm. The rooms, which are spacious, are distinguished above all by their carefully selected pieces of antique furniture, fully corresponding to the boutique style that this hotel in the very heart of Prague is founded upon.

Address

Hotel Leonardo Prague ****
Karoliny Světlé 27
110 00 Praha 1
GPS: 50.084078, 14.414299

EA Hotel Rokoko

In the middle of Wenceslas Square, commonly regarded as the absolute centre of Prague and the scene of most of the Czech Republic’s most important historical events, stands a magnificent protected building known as Palace Rokoko.

Address

EA Hotel Rokoko ****
Václavské náměstí 794/38
110 00 Praha
GPS: 50.084353, 14.427109

EA Hotel Royal Esprit

EA Hotel Royal Esprit is located in the historical, business and social centre of the magnificent city of Prague. Due to crowds of history-hungry tourists, the centre is oftentimes a relatively overcrowded and busy place.

Address

EA Hotel Royal Esprit ****
Jakubská 5
110 00 Praha 1
GPS: 50.088965, 14.426444

EA Ramada Prague City Centre

Hotel Ramada Prague City is located on the upper part of Wenceslas Square, an ideal setting-off point for visiting the landmarks and historical city centre lying just a few minutes by foot from the hotel.

Address

Ramada Prague City Centre ****
Václavské náměstí 41
110 00 Praha 1
GPS: 50.08215, 14.428139

    Kafkas Prague tour        
                                                                                                                                                                    

                              
    
     Tour Kafka´s Prague includes
  • Entry to Old-New Synagogue, Spanish Synagogue, Franz Kafka Museum
  • Coffee and cake at Café Louvre
  • Guide during whole tour
  • Magni guide publication
      Price 1390 Kč per person

      More information you can find HERE!